Things That People Don’t Like to Talk About- I Have a Dog with Issues

A few months ago, I talked about some of Leroy’s flaws and the difficulty that presented when I went on a vacation.  While he is of course the apple of my eye, he is also the most challenging dog I’ve ever had the pleasure of working with.  I am a dog trainer at PetSmart and have had enough fosters and short term guests to know- Leroy is not your average dog.  He excels at being the Worst Dog at Puppy School; but he typically is one of the smartest and often knows the most commands.  About a year ago, we started training class at Opportunity Barks.  We did one day of Real World Manners, but our amazing trainer Michaela was smart enough to know that Leroy had the whole curriculum mastered.  While it was hard for him to be in a new place around strange dogs, he buzzed past the Watch Me’s and Down’s with ease.  She suggested that we move into a Self Control class to work on well, self control.  He was, as I’ve become used to, the Worst Puppy in school.  But we enjoyed the class and learned a lot.  A year later, we are enrolled in Reactive Rover.  I had a brief moment of excitement- “HEY!  These are all of the Worst Puppies in school!  It’s a class just for them!  Maybe my baby Le Le won’t look like a ‘crazy Pit Bull’.  They will understand!”  Well,  my boy is still the Worst Puppy. 😦  He has epic meltdowns that involve whining, crying, barking, and lunging.  He did this all in Reactive Rover on Week 1, when he was shown the stuffed decoy dog.  Yes- stuffed.

And yes- this is the same dog that I call a “pretty gosh darn excellent foster brother”.  So how does it all fit together? How can he be so patient with fosters but so terrible with an innocent stuffed dog?  How can he be so good at his Sit Stays, but so bad at “keeping his shit together”?!  Well.. I’m going to get to the bottom of it all!

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The first thing that I want to explain is a fancy word called “threshold”.  When Leroy is trying to attack a stuffed animal- barking, whining, lunging- he is over his threshold.  I have been reading about this fancy word and I decided to email our expert trainer, Michaela, because I was a bit confused.  Here is her wonderful insight!

“Threshold” is used to differentiate between the state in which your dog can still “think” and respond vs. when arousal level makes it impossible for them to be responsive.  Neurologically, your dog is using a part of the brain and nervous system that goes with the basic “fight-flight-freeze” survival instinct.  If you imagine yourself, say, responding to a robber in your home, your body goes into survival mode (e.g. pumping adrenaline, etc) and relies heavily on action-not thought.  It’s a more primitive bodily reaction that is important to survival but which actually suppresses the decision making part of the brain.
As a dog’s arousal level rises, you see changes like muscle tension, ear and tail position changes, body weight forward, faster breathing, brief “stillness”, staring and targeting, etc…Once a dog goes “over-threshold”, he’s having a full barking-lunging meltdown, acting purely on survival instinct. Little can be learned in this highly adrenalized state because the “higher thinking” part of the brain is suppressed for optimal survival mode.  So learning must be done sub-threshold (that is, when arousal levels are low to moderate, but not over-the-top).
So, yes, Leroy is challenging because he goes over-threshold very quickly, once outside.  However, he’s making great progress at being able to “come down” more quickly in classes.  I hope this helps a bit!
So there you have it!  Threshold is like ‘fight or flight panic’.  It’s all just too much stress and stimulation for my little Pudding Face to handle.  Therefore he has his special meltdowns and looks like an arse.  😉 Another reason that Leroy has so much trouble doing things outside of his comfort zone is because of his past.  Leroy was a lawn ornament.  He was chained.  We can only speculate on how long and how severe his circumstances were, but we do know that he was found with the heavy burden of his past life.

When he was found, the chain was wrapped around his neck and padlocked closed.

Because of his past as a chained dog, Leroy struggles with something called “Leash Reactivity”.  This is actually a pretty common problem among dogs, but especially an issue with dogs that lived with the long term frustration of being at ‘the end of their chain’ every  day.  Imagine for a moment that you are given an 5 foot  radius to live in.  Then picture a sweet smelling flower, or exciting squirrel, or happy human face- standing right past that boundary.  I would not enjoy that.  So when Leroy is on his leash and I’m not letting him go any further, he feels severe frustration and aggression.  If I wanted to use my imagination a bit more, I would say that maybe his childhood puppyhood memories of a cold lonely yard come flooding back.  And he remembers how terrible it was to be stuck in one place without love or freedom or stuffed kongs.  My point is, I would be unhappy about being on a leash too.

Tofu was also a chained dog.

(pre-rescue) Tofu was also a chained dog

I was worried that Leroy’s general stress level and anxiety was one of the main reasons he was not making any progress.  So I talked to Michaela and she agreed that it was time to see a Veterinarian Behaviorist.  Most trainers or behaviorists that I’ve talked to seem to think that medication is very over-prescribed, and often used by people who are lazy not committed to training.  However, Michaela said that she supported my decision and hoped that it would help.  As it sounds, a vet behaviorist is someone who is both a certified behaviorist and trainer, and a fully registered vet.  The best of both worlds!  So we went to Dr. Reisner for a professional opinion.  Here is Leroy’s list of issues, written by a professional.

DIAGNOSIS:

  1. Generalized anxiety
  2. Resource-guarding
  3. Reactivity/impulsivity
  4. Fear-related aggression
  5. Tentative: Predatory behavior

Holy Issues! I knew Leroy was the Worst Puppy, but gosh.  Dr. Reisner said that she was very impressed with me and Leroy.  We are a good team.  He was a bit of a nut case during our consult (as expected, because it was a new place).  But he was a good boy and listened to my commands and hand signals while I talked to the doctor.  At one point I gave him the hand signal for Quiet- putting my finger to my lips (Leroy was whining like a baby about being in a strange office and not getting enough attention from the doctor).  Dr. Reisner said, “Does he know what that means?”  Leroy was trying very hard to listen to me because I had my trusty treat pouch, and he was sitting silently waiting for his reward.  I thought, “How silly, why would I be doing it if he didn’t know what it means!”  But apparently he proved to her that he is a very smart puppy, even though he was also being the Worst Puppy.

So what happens next?  Dr. Reisner decided that Leroy is in fact a good candidate for medication.  He is currently on 20mg a day of Prozac to help manage his generalized anxiety.  Prozac takes 4-6 weeks to become effective, so we haven’t seen any changes yet.  But I’m keeping a close eye on him for side effects or positive changes. Dr. Reisner also seemed to think that our training skills were really great- not that there isn’t always room for improvement.  This made me proud of my boy but also sad, as he was flopping around the exam room like a stressed and anxious fish out of water.  He was unhappy, as he usually is when we do something new.  He did not enjoy this or find it a fun adventure.  He was stressed.

Above all, I want my dog to be happy.  If he doesn’t like new places or new people or new anything, that’s OK with me.  If he can never happily go on a walk without thinking that the world is out to get him, then we won’t go on walks.  He can stay with me in his “happy place”, also known as my bedroom.  But at the end of the day, I want to know that I gave it my all.  I want to say that “Yes, I have a dog with issues.  I did my best to work through them and make him more comfortable in the big scary world we live in.  I accept him and understand his issues.  And I love him anyway.”

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A big *thank you* to Michaela at Opportunity Barks and Dr. Reisner for all the help and support ❤

Vet Appointment! – The Good

Well yesterday I shared some potentially not so good news about Tofu’s eye.  However, today I want to share how great she was at her vet appointment!  Everyone just loved her to pieces.  She had a special bond with the vet tech who also happens to have a deaf and vision impaired dog.  What a coincidence!  She wowed the vet with kisses and cuddles, and tail wags.  LOTS of tail wags. 🙂  Tofu was a very well behaved angel and I was a proud foster mamma.

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Tofu has a great smile 🙂

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Oh and of course, we were sporting LCPO’s “Adopt Me” vest so that everyone knew she was looking for a home!  Her forever family hasn’t found her yet, but they’re out there ❤

If you have any questions about Tofu, Jora, becoming a foster parent, or the adoption process- you can email me (Leroy’s mom) at Casey@caseyheyen.com

Sponsor me here: All donations are tax deducible and benefit the rescue dogs of LCPO

Vet Appointment! – The Bad

Well poor little Tofu has been having some skin irritation, she also needed to get another vaccination, and we wanted to check on her lazy eye- So, we scheduled a vet appointment! As a foster parent, I do not pay for Tofu’s vet care.  I provide her with food, toys, training, socialization,  love, structure, and confidence.  However, vet care is something that I cannot cover (as a student with big loans looming over my head).  I wish I could, and I hope to be able to in the future.  But for now, we thank LCPO for being so amazing and providing wonderful care for their puppies.

In case you didn’t know, Tofu is deaf!  But please don’t tell her, we don’t want her to be self conscious.  We’ve also realized that she has a lazy eye that may be resulting in vision impairment.  So sure, she’s a little “special”.

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You can see her droopy eye on the left.  She doesn’t seem to mind in the slightest!  But we wanted to make sure it was OK and that there was nothing we could do to help her.

Well sadly, the vet said that it did not appear to be a regular cataract.  She wasn’t sure what was wrong so she suggested we look into an eye specialist for our girl.  It could potentially be anything from a different type of cataract to a tumor 😦  And the best solution may be removing the eye.  We are going to watch it carefully and have it looked at it again in the future.  My poor foster girl has a few issues going on!  However, neither of us notice them very much.  Especially when there is cuddling or kissing involved. 🙂

Ok, you can notice a little during cuddling :)

Ok, you can notice a little during cuddling 🙂

Please send her some good, happy vibes to help her keep her eye and find an adoptive family. ❤  She is truly a doll!

If you have any questions about Tofu, Jora, becoming a foster parent, or the adoption process- you can email me (Leroy’s mom) at Casey@caseyheyen.com

Sponsor me here: All donations are tax deducible and benefit the rescue dogs of LCPO

Why I Do What I Do- Take Two

In my last post, I shared with you my first success story as a foster mom.  Today I want to share my second fostering experience.  This is the story of Dillon Pickles.  Dillon is the reason why I will continue to foster and fight for these dogs.  He is my motivation, my reminder, my reason to help.

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When I first heard about Dillon, he was waiting at our local SPCA and had come in as a stray.  He was only about 5 months old, and said to be the sweetest boy ever with a zest for life.  Dillon was covered in a terrible skin infection and at first sight did not seem to be acting “normal”. The shelter vet quickly came to understand that Dillon was suffering from some type of neurological disorder, believed to be missing part of his brain or having a loss of function in part of his brain. Because of his special needs we were asked to help.   The shelter could not adopt him out into a home so they would have to euthanize him if we said no.  Dillon actually had a few offers of people who were interested in fostering him.  However, the president of the rescue said she wanted him with me.  I am not the type of person that will say ‘No’ to something like this very easily.  There were reasons why he should be with me and not the others.  I also believe that fate was playing its hand.  So of course, I agreed to foster Dillon Pickles.

All we knew was that Dillon was very sweet, very happy and full of life but he was without a doubt, a special needs little guy. Dillon’s growth was off.  He would shake his head every few moments and could not walk without falling or banging into something. He was given the nickname Crash at the shelter because he would crash into things very often, although it did not seem to phase him or crush his spirits!  Our plan for Dillon was to get him an MRI and hopefully repair his issue; then adopt him out to a forever home.  Here is a video of him at the shelter.

Once Dillon got settled in at my house, I did the write up for his adoption page.

“From the foster”- Having Dillon as a foster is like having a sign that says “Have you laughed today?” running around the house. 🙂 His name, Silly Dilly, suits him well. He is a spunky baby boy who loves wiggling around at top speed, giving kisses, and cuddling up as close as possible. He has a special appreciation for life… He falls down and he picks himself back up (as many times as he needs to). He loves to take all of the toys out of the toy box and pile them up on his dog bed. He has lots of fun with his foster brother. Their favorite activity is playing tug of war together. Dillon can’t go for walks unless he wears socks or booties because of the way he drags his paws, but he’s happy hanging out inside as long as he has toys to play with. He also can’t go up or down steps, so his ideal home would be a ranch or with an adopter who doesn’t mind picking him up ever now and then. 🙂 He’s a very special boy deserves an amazing forever home ♥

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Dillon was a joy to foster.  He was so happy about everything.   He loved everyone and everything he met.  We did our initial consultation at UPenn and he was a big hit.  At this point he did need to be carried around a little bit.  He couldn’t do steps and he would cut up his feet if he walked on concrete for too long because of the way he dragged his paws.  The vet staff loved him!  We did blood work and ruled out a few things that he didn’t have.  The vet believed that his issue was not in fact neurological, but a problem in his spinal cord.  We expected to know more after his MRI and would be scheduling that as soon as we could.  Video of Dillon at my house.

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Dillon and Leroy became wonderful friends.  He worked his way into my heart too.  I would pick him up and help him on the bed to cuddle with us.  He would immediately squirm his way right up to my pillow and snuggle his face next to mine. This boy knew how to melt hearts!

Best Friends

Best Friends

Seriously, does it get any cuter than this??  Nope.

Best Friends

Best Friends

As the month went on, we held a big fundraiser event for Dillon.  He met tons of his fans and followers.  Everyone loved him.  Everyone.  But I could see that Dillon’s condition was getting worse, and it seemed to be happening very quickly.  We scheduled another appointment at UPenn to see what we could do.   As I carried my baby boy into the waiting room (yes, I carried all 50 pounds of him around pretty regularly at this point), the front desk assistant jumped up and said, “Emergency Room?!  This way!”  At the time, I brushed it off and replied, “Oh no, we have an appointment.”  But when I gently put Dillon down on the floor in the waiting room, I could see that everyone was looking at him differently.  Not because he was cute, or a Pit Bull, or doing something adorable; but because he was sick.

The vet was again wonderful with him.  But because of the quick progression of his disease, she explained that the MRI would not be necessary.  He had lost most function in his front legs and his back legs weren’t doing much better.  He looked tired and some of his love for life was not quite there.  The vet politely explained that there were likely many issues going on with him and an MRI and surgery would not solve the problems anymore.  He was not going to get better.

Dillon was very used to being carried around.

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You can see in Dillon’s “dress up” picture that this little angel was tired.  Leroy was always there for his brother.  He tried to help Dillon play tug of war and had more snuggle times. I cannot explain the last few weeks that I spent with Dillon.  It was heartbreaking, but wonderful.  To give of yourself, unselfishly, is a great gift.  To work and expect nothing in return; to love more than your heart can bare; to cry for a life slipping away; to be completely powerless- fostering Dillon changed my life, and I will always be grateful for that.

Rest In Peace <3
Rest In Peace ❤

From LCPO-

 It is with sheer heartache that we share our sweet Dillon Pickles crossed the rainbow bridge today. After months of struggle, poking, prodding, questions, and a clear rapid decline, we had to make the best decision for Dillon and that was to let him go. There was nothing more any of his Dr’s could do as his diagnosis was now degenerative and at a clearly rapid rate. Dillon could no longer walk, he couldn’t stand to go to the bathroom anymore, he spent too much time crying out and was clearly unhappy and declining further by the day. Dillon spent his last day with many of the people that love him, with some of the LCPO avail-a-bully alumni and making some new last minute friends. Dillon was always a loving, forgiving, patient boy. He has left quite an impression on us all and we will always love him. We thank you for your support and compassion for Dillon as well as all of our very special avail-a-bullies. We love each and every one of them as our own and a loss like this is crippling to us.  Run free now Dillon, finally run! ♥

Rest in peace Dillon- 5/5/12 ♥  While Dillon was never officially “adopted”, he lived out his short, yet wonderful life with me and Leroy.  He was always treated like family and Leroy and I both loved him dearly.  Dillon will always be a part of my heart and a huge reason behind why I foster.  We miss you Dillon Pickles.  ❤

Love is an infinite resource

Fingers Crossed!

We had a busy Thanksgiving weekend that included a special meet and greet for Jora! Baby J enjoyed some time with the potential adopters, met their Guinea pig and happily smelled their entire home and backyard. The family is going to talk it over before rushing into such an important decision. There is a lot to consider before adopting a lifelong companion!

In other news, Jora has a vet appointment to recheck her mange. She is looking great and has been on supplements, vitamins, medication, prescription baths, and high quality food for months now.

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Please keep your fingers crossed for her first negative mange skin scrape and that she made a great impression during her meet and greet!

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Jora’s Story

Resilient-  Able to withstand or recover quickly from difficult conditions.

Jora was found running around Luzerne County as a stray.  She was only 4 months old.  She was covered in Demodex Mange.  Demodex mange is caused by mites which we cannot see.  All dogs and even humans have these mites.  However, they can cause the Demodex disease when an abnormal immune system allows their numbers to get out of control. This occurs primarily in puppies and in adult dogs with lowered immunity.  Poor living conditions, stress, and lack of treatment can make this problem much worse.  This is what Jora looked like when she entered the rescue program-

  

Mange causes itching, irritation, loss of fur, secondary skin infections, swelling, a particular “mange” smell, and a general “un-cuteness”.  Jora was just a little baby lab mix, but no one wanted her because of the way she looked.  Jora’s original foster home had to move suddenly and was not able to continue fostering.  SO at that time, I offered to take in this little peanut.  Jora has been with me since she was about 6 months old.  She looks much better now, but she is still battling mange.

Now Jora is 11 months old.  And while all rescue dogs have a sad story, I feel especially sad that she’s never had a “real” family at any point in her life.  I also am wondering why she keeps being overlooked and has been up for adoption for her whole puppy hood.

Despite all of the moving and instability and trips to the vet and medication and itching; Jora is resilient.  She might not have kicked her mange yet, but she is a joy to be around every single day.  She is happy when she wakes up.  She’s never stressed or upset.  She loves exploring new places, she adores new people.  And she’s a sweet, confident girl.


If you have any suggestions on getting the word out about Jora, I would love to hear them!    I am truly puzzled at how she’s still with me.  More information about mange can be found here- Demodex Mange.  Information about out Jora’s rescue group and how to donate to her vet care can be found here- LCPO

Any questions about Jora or the adoption process can emailed to me (Casey, aka Leroy’s mom!) at Casey@caseyheyen.com.  Please share her story with anyone looking for the perfect family companion!